Health & Habits

Buyers Guide: What to Look for in a Protein Powder

Posted June 11, 2021

Protein plays a vital role in the daily functioning of our bodies and is essential for muscle growth, healing, reproduction and maintaining a healthy immune system. We use protein to build and repair tissue, therefore making it an essential macronutrient for muscle growth. But muscles aren’t the only part of the body that benefit from protein - brain function improves, fatigue is reduced, and even weight loss can occur. Protein breaks down into amino acids (the building blocks of protein) which are essential to the synthesis of hormones and neurotransmitters.

Choosing the Right Product

Anyone can use protein powder to naturally enrich their diet and reach their health and fitness goals. It's commonly consumed in shake form, but can also be enjoyed in baked goods, mixed with oatmeal, or added to smoothies. Protein powder is popularly used by both men and women, beginners, gym goers, athletes and bodybuilders looking to increase their protein levels and keep up with rigorous workout routines.

Given the plethora of options on the market, finding the best protein powder for ourselves requires a reflection of our lifestyle choices, dietary requirements, and fitness goals. It’s important we choose the right product that suits our needs and supports our health. Diligence is key when reading through all the ingredients listed in protein powder formulas these days, and knowing what to avoid is equally as important as knowing what to choose.

WARNING: STAY AWAY!

Fillers, chemicals, allergens, fats, artificial flavors/sweeteners, and corn syrup are obvious ingredients to stay away from. They can cause digestive distress, trigger inflammation, and promote disease. But taking a step further to investigate the vetting process of the ingredients - from source, to production, to consumer - is just as important. An independent study looked at 134 of the top selling protein powders today, and found that many contained contaminants like lead, BPA, mercury, cadmium and arsenic - substances which have been linked to multiple cancers, reproductive harm and brain damage.

Vedge Plant Protein

Our main priority at Vedge is ingredient quality and functionality. We test each ingredient before it even enters our formula during the research and development process, then test our approved formula in-house. After that, we send the final product out for 3rd-party testing to confirm our results and complete a three-way check.

Centered around USDA certified organic peas, organic pumpkin seeds and organic sunflower seeds, Vedge Plant Protein provides a complete amino acid profile without GMOs, artificial flavors, artificial dyes or colors, unnecessary flow agents or fillers. We test against microbes, pathogens, heavy metals, glyphosate, pesticides, and herbicides to ensure the cleanest product reaches our end consumer. Compared to whey or casein protein powders, a vegan solution eliminates allergy symptoms and lactose intolerances, and also promotes environmental stability and ethical treatment of animals.

TRY IT FOR YOURSELF! 

New Study of Protein Powders from Clean Label Project Finds Elevated Levels of Heavy Metals and BPA in 53 Leading Brands Denver, CO – February 27, 2018

About Clean Label Project Denver-based Clean Label Project is a nonprofit organization dedicated to educating the public about the toxins and nutritional value in consumer products through its studies conducted by independent third-party laboratories. By sharing the results of scientific data directly with consumers, the organization seeks to assist the public in making the most informed choice possible each time they shop. The Clean Label Project believes consumers have a right to know what kinds of contaminants it tests for in consumer goods and the potential effects of toxins on health. Education is its core initiative and more can be learned by visiting cleanlabelproject.org. Clean Label Project. Clean. Pure. Science.®

By Vedge Nutrition

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